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Come, But Not Gone

15 Mar

The 15th of March is always an occasion on which to ponder a much-remembered event of ancient history, while perhaps exercising an element of caution throughout our own day! 

In modern times, the term Ides of March is best known as the date that Julius Caesar was killed in 44 B.C. Julius Caesar was stabbed (23 times) to death, led by Marcus Junius Brutus, Gaius Cassius Longinus and 60 other conspirators.

On his way to the Theatre of Pompey (where he would be assassinated), Caesar saw a seer who had foretold that harm would come to him not later than the Ides of March. Caesar joked, “Well, the Ides of March have come”, to which the seer replied “Ay, they have come, but they are not gone.”  This meeting is famously dramatized in William Shakespeare’s play Julius Caesar, when Caesar is warned to “beware the Ides of March”.  (Read more on Wikipedia.)

The Ides have come, but not gone.  Go forth and beware!

 
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Posted by on March 15, 2011 in History

 

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